‘Tis the Season: A Reflection and a Request for Prayer Concerning the United Methodist Appointive Process

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I ask for the prayers of those of you who pray.

I am honored to be part of a ministry team called the Appointive Cabinet. More specifically, it is the Appointive Cabinet of the Western Pennsylvania Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church.

This week, I will join my Cabinet colleagues at Olmsted Manor for a retreat. Part of our work at this retreat will be to clarify our vison and prepare our hearts for the upcoming appointment season—a yearly time of discernment in which we give focused attention to the deployment of our clergy and the making of strategic clergy appointments.

As all United Methodists know, our denomination’s unique system of appointment-making is far from perfect. At times, it groans for redemption along with the rest of creation. While engaged prayerfully and diligently by a Bishop and District Superintendents who pour nothing less than a whole heart into their work, the truth of the matter is that perspectives are sometimes limited. Discernment is sometimes distorted or incomplete. Agendas and priorities are sometimes unintentionally misplaced.

As a result, our appointment system has sometimes led to woundedness. Painful disruption. Skepticism and cynicism born from frustrations over decisions that are seen as imprudent. Frustration over what is sometimes perceived as an inequitable application or expectation of itineracy.

Some have even come to the conclusion that our appointment system is too outdated—or too broken—to be effective any longer.

I am not debating that matter here, nor am I inviting such a debate.

I will simply share with you a perspective that my wife Tara offered to me several years ago. (Tara, by the way, was raised in the Baptist tradition. She lived in the same house for her entire upbringing. She had no idea that she would one day be a United Methodist—and married to an itinerant United Methodist pastor no less!) At one point, when we were approached by the Cabinet unexpectedly about the possibility of a new pastoral appointment, Tara responded in this fashion:

I like that we do not get to select where we live and serve and that congregations don’t get to select their pastors…Strange as it might sound, it feels right for us not to have that choice. So, if I have to decide between relying solely on my own discernment about where to live and serve and relying on the discernment of a Bishop and Cabinet that have been entrusted by the church with the responsibility of determining where we are most needed, I’ll choose the Bishop and Cabinet…not because I believe that the Bishop and Cabinet are always right, but because, concerning our appointment, I am more willing to trust their shared perspective than I am my own preferences. My preferences are too often twisted.

At which point I said to Tara, “Wow. You really ARE a United Methodist, aren’t you?”

I am grateful for Tara’s leadership in that moment. I return to her words often, simply because they remind me of what the United Methodist appointment system can be at its best:

Meaningfully disruptive.

Refreshingly hopeful.

Dynamically creative.

Unsettlingly adventurous.

Heartwarmingly sacrificial.

Evangelically strategic.

Imperfect, but purposeful.

Flawed, but redemptive.

Awkward, but linked to a narrative grounded in a countercultural theology of going where sent for the sake of the Gospel.

And so, I return to my initial request:

I ask for the prayers of those of you who pray.

Pray for Bishop Cynthia Moore-Koikoi, whose leadership I so deeply admire, whose integrity shapes me, and who holds the weight of appointment-making in her heart with consistent grace and wisdom.

Pray for the District Superintendents and the Assistant to the Bishop, that we might approach this appointment season with good priorities, clear vision, a right sense of our own fallenness, and a keen awareness of how deeply we are in over our heads.

Pray for those clergypersons who will be retiring this year and who are preparing for the next segment of their journey.

Pray for those clergypersons returning from seminary or licensing school, eager for what is perhaps their first full time or part time pastoral appointment.

Pray for those congregations that will experience transition in this appointment season, since such transitions often involve painful goodbyes and crucial hellos.

Pray for our appointive process, that it might become an instrument through which God equips the church to engage more comprehensively in its grand and glorious mission: To make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world.

Thank you in advance for your ministry of prayer.

4 thoughts on “‘Tis the Season: A Reflection and a Request for Prayer Concerning the United Methodist Appointive Process

  1. My prayers are with all of you privileged to serve on the Ministry Team, for God’s leadership during this special Conference.

    Thank you for sharing this, Eric. Blessings, Lota Jones

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    Liked by 1 person

  2. My prayers are with all of you as you pray and discuss and follow God’s guidance on the upcoming appointments.
    Thank you for sharing Tara’s words of wisdom. As a future wife of a Methodist pastor, I am going to copy these into my journal and keep them close to remember. My preferences are also way too twisted and I need to remember that God knows best.
    My word for this year is “TRUST “
    Praying for you my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Praying for all of you as you make important decisions for clergy and the churches of this conference. May God’s will be done on earth as it is in heaven!

    Like

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